ATI TEAS GUIDE TO SCIENCE | THE MUSCULAR SYSTEM

Bodily Organs and Systems – The Muscular System

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QUIZ QUESTIONS LISTED AT END OF REVIEW

Questions related to the Bodily Organs and Systems will test your knowledge of structures and functions within the ten human organ systems that are essential to life. You may also be tested on vocabulary terms related to your understanding of anatomy. You must understand these vital body systems when caring for patient’s co-morbidities.

Please note that the ATI TEAS will only cover basic knowledge of bodily organs and systems. More in-depth knowledge will be covered in our Anatomy and Physiology Series.

Let’s get started on understanding how the bodily organs and systems are important on the ATI TEAS.




 

THE MUSCULAR SYSTEM

The muscular system is responsible for movement in the body, such as walking and circulating blood. Another important function of this system is sustaining posture and body position.

Muscles are made up of bundles called myofibrils. These elongated contractile threads are made of sarcomere units. Each sarcomere unit contains long protein filaments: actin (thin filaments) and myosin (thick filaments). These filaments slide past each other to contact and relax the muscles.

There are three different types of muscle

  • Cardiac muscle pumps blood from the heart to the entire body. Its functions are controlled by the nervous system and are involuntary.
  • Smooth (visceral) muscle is found in the walls of organs, such as the stomach and intestines. These muscles help move substances through the organs. Its functions are controlled by the nervous system and is involuntary.
  • Skeletal muscle is attached to bone by tendons and provides movement to the body when the muscles pull on the bones. It’s functions by contracting or shortening their length and pulling one bone to another and is voluntary (you are able to control them). This is the only muscle type that is voluntary
    • The origin of a muscle is located on an immobile bone where the muscle is connected.
    • The attachment of the muscle to the mobile bone is called the insertion.